Emulsification

The phospholipids, lipoproteins and proteins found in egg yolks are surface-active agents that enable the formation of emulsions between unmixable liquids such as oil and water.

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Whipping & Foaming

An egg’s viscosity is ideal for incorporating air cells during the whipping or beating process. By doing so, air bubbles decrease in size and increase in number.

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Flavor

The egg can be an essential ingredient when it comes to taste. Egg yolks contain fats that carry and blend flavors when used in foods. Eggs provide a well-rounded, yet neutral, richness to foods.

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Crystallization Control

Eggs can improve texture and acceptability throughout the freeze thaw cycle by controlling ice crystallization – which helps to prevent sogginess in final prepared meals.

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Protein Enrichment

If you are looking for protein, look no further than the egg! Since eggs provide a wide variety of nutrients for a relatively low-calorie count, eggs and egg products are considered nutrient-dense.

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Thickening Agent

When two unfolded protein molecules with oppositely charged ends approach each other, the molecules unite or coagulate. This causes the egg product to change from a liquid to a semi-solid or solid.

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Binding & Gelling

Egg proteins provide the structure and coagulative properties to bind food products together.

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Browning & Coating

When exposed to heat, proteins in egg products participate in the Maillard reaction, producing a desirable brown color. Egg yolk contains xanthophyll, which has a yellow-orange pigment, contributing to the rich color of various foods.

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Leavening

When eggs are beaten, they can expand to a foam that’s up to eight times their original volume!

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